Understanding History: And Other Essays

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Philosophical Library/Open Road #ad - In short, here is a complete banquet of provocative ideas—wise and witty; skeptical and profound—to whet the appetite of every discriminating reader. Essays on topics from nuclear physics to the role of faith in society from the Nobel Prize–winning philosopher. Then in a series of articles on a subject near to his heart, idealism, he explores the effect of atomic physics on such philosophic concepts as materialism, determinism and faith.

In “the value of free thought, ” russell once again proves himself a ruthless foe of stifling orthodoxy and a fearless champion of free thought, free action and free speech. The title piece exposes the deadliness of the academic approach to the past, and shows how the reading of history can be a vivid intellectual pleasure.

Understanding History: And Other Essays #ad - Originally written in 1943 and published in 1957 by Philosophical Library, Inc, these vigorous essays from one of the most distinguished minds of our time reveal several facets of the English philosopher’s thought.

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The Will to Doubt

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Philosophical Library/Open Road #ad - In a brilliant series of essays, Bertrand Russell uses challenging skepticism and sharp humor to attack the obstacles to building a society based on reason. His topics range from the defects of the education system to the failure of the belief among the younger generation, from our mistaken concepts of democracy to the ever-present threat to freedom throughout the world—even in the West which prides itself so much on being free.

Russell’s thoughts are as lively and pertinent today as when they were written. One of modern history’s great thinkers takes on prejudice, superstition,  and conventional wisdom, using wit and insight to argue for a rational way of life.

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Essays in Skepticism

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Philosophical Library/Open Road #ad - From one of the greatest philosophers of the twentieth century: A collection of accessible and enlightening essays on topics from envy to intellectual rubbish. Here are titles, taken at random from the table of contents: psychoanalysis Takes a Look; Envy and Belief; On Male Superiority; What Social Science Can Do; Intellectual Rubbish; Don’t Be Too Certain; On Being Old.

In this small book are some of his old but nonetheless remarkable observations, and some of the thoughts he expressed on his 90th birthday. Russell, is always meaningful, the sage non-conformist, no matter what the topic or the issue.  .

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The Cycles of American History

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Mariner Books #ad - Destiny—through two centuries of political evolution, conflict, and progress. A celebrated historian, and adviser to President Kennedy, speechwriter, Arthur M. A pulitzer prize–winning historian discusses “the Cold War, the presidency, political parties, and many broader philosophical issues with incisive wit” Library Journal.

First-rate history mixed with a strong sense of public service. The christian Science Monitor. In this updated edition, schlesinger reflects on the dawn of a new millennium and how new social and technological revolutions could lead to a revolution in American political cycles. Draws on decades of astute observation to construct a dialectic of American politics, or as Time magazine called it, a “recurring struggle between pragmatism and idealism in the American soul.

The Cycles of American History #ad - The cycles of american History traces two conflicting visions of America—Experiment vs. Schlesinger Jr. Whatever the nation’s political future, it can benefit from the intelligence and regard for our country’s best traditions evident in these informed and humane essays. Thenew york times   “displays the author at his best: trenchant, erudite, crisp.

Foreign affairs   “an excellent and provocative primer on the challenges surrounding the contemporary American political setting .  .  .

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Zeno and the Tortoise: How to Think Like a Philosopher

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Atlantic Monthly Press #ad - In a witty and engaging style that incorporates everything from sting to cell phones to Bill Gates, Rousseau’s social contract, the Socratic method, Bentham’s theory of utilitarianism, and, Fearn demystifies the ways of thought that have shaped and inspired humanity—among many others, Descartes’s use of doubt, of course, the concept of common sense.

For those who don’t know the difference between lucretius’s spear and Hume’s fork, Zeno and the Tortoise explains not just who each philosopher was and what he thought, but exactly how he came to think in the way he did. Acute, but always authoritative, often irreverent, this is a unique introduction to the ideas that have shaped us all.

Zeno and the Tortoise: How to Think Like a Philosopher #ad - An academic arsenal of philosophical weapons that are keen for slicing and stabbing through the slippery profoundities of day-to-day decision-making and right into the middle of dinner-party conversations of which you would have otherwise been left out. Philosophy Now. A large, crafty bag of brilliant tools .

 .  . From the author of the latest answers to the Oldest Questions, a philosophical guide that’s “great for sounding cleverer than you really are” Men’s Health. Along the way, there are fascinating biographical snippets about the philosophers themselves: the story of Thales falling down a well while studying the stars, and of Socrates being told by a face-reader that his was the face of a monster who was capable of any crime.

Written in twenty-five short chapters, each readable during the journey to work, Zeno and the Tortoise is the ideal course in intellectual self-defense.

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The Myth of the Lost Cause and Civil War History

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Indiana University Press #ad - A “well-reasoned and timely” Booklist essay collection interrogates the Lost Cause myth in Civil War historiography. Was the confederacy doomed from the start in its struggle against the superior might of the Union? Did its forces fight heroically against all odds for the cause of states’ rights? In reality, these suggestions are an elaborate and intentional effort on the part of Southerners to rationalize the secession and the war itself.

The lost Cause .  .  . In the myth of the lost cause and civil war history, nine historians describe and analyze the Lost Cause, identifying ways in which it falsifies history—creating a volume that makes a significant contribution to Civil War historiography. Is a tangible and influential phenomenon in American culture and this book provides an excellent source for anyone seeking to explore its various dimensions.

The Myth of the Lost Cause and Civil War History #ad - Southern Historian. Unfortunately, skillful propagandists have been so successful in promoting this romanticized view that the Lost Cause has assumed a life of its own. Misrepresenting the war’s true origins and its actual course, the myth of the Lost Cause distorts our national memory.

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If This Isn't Nice, What Is?: The Graduation Speeches and Other Words to Live By

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RosettaBooks #ad - Like mark Twain, Mr. Master storyteller and satirist Kurt Vonnegut was one of the most in-demand commencement speakers of his time. This expanded second edition also includes more than sixty pages of further thoughts from Vonnegut whose good advice wasn’t limited to graduation speeches. Vonnegut used humor to tackle the basic questions of human existence.

The new york Times. A collection of commencement speeches and other wit and wisdom from the New York Times–bestselling literary icon and author of Slaughterhouse-Five. Edited by dan wakefield, and including such pieces as “how to make money and find love!, ” “how to Have Something Most Billionaires Don’t, ” and “Somebody Should Have Told Me Not to Join a Fraternity, ” this book reads like a narrative in the unique voice that made Vonnegut a hero to readers everywhere.

If This Isn't Nice, What Is?: The Graduation Speeches and Other Words to Live By #ad - For each occasion, vonnegut’s words were unfailingly insightful and witty, and they stayed with audience members long after graduation. Hilarious, freewheeling, razor-sharp, and at times deeply serious, these reflections are ideal not just for graduates but for anyone undergoing what Vonnegut would call their “long-delayed puberty ceremony”—marking the long and challenging passage to full-time adulthood.

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Big History: From the Big Bang to the Present

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The New Press #ad - This exciting saga crosses space and time to illustrate how humans, born of stardust, were shaped—and how they in turn shaped the world we know today. Publishers weekly   this book offers “world history on a grand scale”—pulling back for a wider view and putting the relatively brief time span of human history in context.

This new edition is more relevant than ever before, as we increasingly grapple with accelerating rates of change and, ultimately, the legacy we will bequeath to future generations. Big history interweaves different disciplines of knowledge, drawing on both the natural sciences and the human sciences, to offer an all-encompassing account of history on Earth.

Big History: From the Big Bang to the Present #ad - . After all, our five thousand years of recorded civilization account for only about one millionth of the lifetime of our planet Kirkus Reviews. Here is a path-breaking portrait of our world, from the birth of the universe from a single point the size of an atom to life on a twenty-first-century planet inhabited by seven billion people.

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The Art of Philosophizing: And Other Essays

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Philosophical Library/Open Road #ad - Three essays on mathematics, logic, and philosophy from the Noble Prize–winning author of A History of Western Philosophy. The simplicity of russell’s exposition is astonishing, as is his ability to get to the core of the great philosophical issues and to skillfully probe the depth of philosophical analysis.

The essays in this little volume, published here for the first time in book form, were written by Bertrand Russell during the Second World War when he was less concerned with the stormy issues of nuclear warfare and the containment of Communist aggression and more with “the art of reckoning” in the fields of mathematics, logic and philosophy.

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Principles of Cartesian Philosophy

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Philosophical Library/Open Road #ad - This book provides depth and insight into the philosophical doctrine of Rene Descartes, and compares it to the metaphysics of Spinoza himself.

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The Liberal Tradition in America: The Classic on the Causes and Effects of Liberal Thought in the U.S. Harvest Books

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Mariner Books #ad - Fascinating reading. The review of politics  Includes an introduction by Tom Wicker. This “brilliantly written” look at the original meaning of the liberal philosophy has become a classic of political science American Historical Review. Louis hartz, shows how individual liberty, who taught government at Harvard, equality, and capitalism have been the values at the root of liberalism—and offers enlightening historical context that reminds us of America’s unique place and important role in the world.

Winner of the woodrow wilson foundation award   as the word “liberal” has been misused and its meaning diluted in recent decades, this study of American political thought since the Revolution is a valuable look at the “liberal tradition” that has been central to US history. Lively and thought-provoking .

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