The Constants of Nature: The Numbers That Encode the Deepest Secrets of the Universe

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Vintage #ad - In the constants of Nature, Cambridge Professor and bestselling author John D. Barrow takes us on an exploration of these governing principles. Perhaps most tantalizingly, Barrow theorizes about the realities that might one day be found in a universe with different parameters than our own. Drawing on physicists such as Einstein and Planck, Barrow illustrates with stunning clarity our dependence on the steadfastness of these principles.

Reality as we know it is bound by a set of constants—numbers and values that dictate the strengths of forces like gravity, the speed of light, and the masses of elementary particles. But he also suggests that the basic forces may have been radically different during the universe’s infancy, and suggests that they may continue a deeply hidden evolution.

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Einstein's Dice and Schrödinger's Cat: How Two Great Minds Battled Quantum Randomness to Create a Unified Theory of Physics

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Basic Books #ad - As in so many things, even when they were wrong, Einstein and Schrödinger couldn't help but get a great deal right. As halpern explains, the recent discovery of the Higgs Boson makes the Standard Model-the closest thing we have to a unified theory- nearly complete. But these two giants did more than just criticize: they fought back, seeking a Theory of Everything that would make the universe seem sensible again.

In einstein's dice and schrödinger's cat, physicist Paul Halpern tells the little-known story of how Einstein and Schrödinger searched, first as collaborators and then as competitors, for a theory that transcended quantum weirdness. A fascinating and thought-provoking story, one that sheds light on the origins of.

. Neither man was ever satisfied with the standard interpretation of quantum mechanics, however, and both rebelled against what they considered the most preposterous aspect of quantum mechanics: its randomness. This story of their quest-which ultimately failed-provides readers with new insights into the history of physics and the lives and work of two scientists whose obsessions drove its progress.

Einstein's Dice and Schrödinger's Cat: How Two Great Minds Battled Quantum Randomness to Create a Unified Theory of Physics #ad - Today, much of modern physics remains focused on the search for a Theory of Everything. The current challenging situation in physics. Wall street journalwhen the fuzzy indeterminacy of quantum mechanics overthrew the orderly world of Isaac Newton, Albert Einstein and Erwin Schrödinger were at the forefront of the revolution.

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Electric Universe: How Electricity Switched on the Modern World

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Broadway Books #ad - In harnessing its power, we have created a world of wonders—complete with roller coasters and radar, computer networks and psychopharmaceuticals. In electric universe, who struggled against the prejudices of the british class system, the great discoverers come to life in all their brilliance and idiosyncrasy, including the visionary Michael Faraday, and Samuel Morse, before inventing the telegraph, a painter who, ran for mayor of New York City on a platform of persecuting Catholics.

For centuries, electricity was seen as little more than a curious property of certain substances that sparked when rubbed. Then, in the 1790s, alessandro Volta began the scientific investigation that ignited an explosion of knowledge and invention. From the frigid waters of the atlantic to the streets of Hamburg during a World War II firestorm to the interior of the human body, Electric Universe is a mesmerizing journey of discovery.

Electric Universe: How Electricity Switched on the Modern World #ad - . Here too is alan turing, whose dream of a marvelous thinking machine—what we know as the computer—was met with indifference, and who ended his life in despair after British authorities forced him to undergo experimental treatments to “cure” his homosexuality. The bestselling author of e=mc2 weaves tales of romance, divine inspiration, and fraud through an account of the invisible force that permeates our universe—electricity—and introduces us to the virtuoso scientists who plumbed its secrets.

The force that once seemed inconsequential was revealed to be responsible for everything from the structure of the atom to the functioning of our brains.

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It All Adds Up: The Story of People and Mathematics

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William Collins #ad - Fascinating … so enlightening that suddenly maths doesn’t seem so fearsome as it once did’ SIMON WINCHESTERFrom Aristotle to Ada Lovelace: a brief history of the mathematical ideas that have forever changed the world and the everyday people and pioneers behind them. In museums, monuments or train stations, how babylonian scholars developed one of the first complex written languages, he uses the objects around us to explain what art can reveal about geometry, and how ‘Arabic’ numbers were adopted from India.

With clarity, passion and wisdom, the author unveils the unexpected and at times serendipitous ways in which big mathematical ideas were created. It is a journey into numbers with Launay as a guide. They are so indispensable that we forget how fundamental they are to our way of life. In this international bestseller, Mickaël Launay mixes history and anecdotes from around the world to reveal how mathematics became pivotal to the story of humankind.

It All Adds Up: The Story of People and Mathematics #ad - The story of our best invention yet. From our ability to calculate the passing of time to the algorithms that control computers and much else in our lives, numbers are everywhere. It all adds up also tells the story of how mapping the trajectory of an eclipse has helped to trace the precise day of one of the oldest battles in history, how the course of the modern-day Greenwich Meridian was established, and why negative numbers were accepted just last century.

This book is a vital compendium of the great men and women of mathematics from Aristotle to Ada Lovelace, which demonstrates how mathematics shaped the written word and the world.

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They Laughed at Galileo: How the Great Inventors Proved Their Critics Wrong

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Skyhorse #ad - Edward L. A humorous account of great inventors and their critics who predicted failure. They laughed at galileo takes a humorous and reflective look at one thousand years of the development of humankind: those who dreamt, those who taught, those who opposed, and those who, ultimately, did. At some point in modern history, each and every one of our inventions and discoveries was first envisioned and then developed by a single person, or a handful of people, who dreamt of the seemingly impossible.

Drake’s eventual success on august 27, 1859, was called the day “the crazy man first struck oil. Louis pasteur’s theory of germs was considered a “ridiculous fiction. Each of these inventions has had a profound effect on the course of human history, resisted, and each one was rejected, and ridiculed in its day.

They Laughed at Galileo: How the Great Inventors Proved Their Critics Wrong #ad - . Ultimately, the innovators who brought these into existence provided invaluable contributions to science and the culture of humankind. For them, the future was clear and obvious, but for the vast majority, including the acknowledged experts of their days, such belief was sheer folly. For just about everything that has improved our modern lifestyles in a way that our ancestors could not possibly imagine, there was once a lone dreamer proclaiming, “It can be done.

That dreamer was nearly always opposed by a team of “enlightened” contemporaries publicly declaring, “It cannot be done. Well, yes it could.

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Chancing It: The Laws of Chance and How They Can Work for You

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Skyhorse #ad - Whether you call it probability, risk, or uncertainty, the workings of chance often defy common sense. He gives you access to some of the most potent intellectual tools ever developed and explains how to use them to guide your judgments and decisions. By the end of the book, you will know:how to understand and even predict coincidenceswhen an insurance policy is worth havingWhy “expert” predictions are often misleadingHow to tell when a scientific claim is a breakthrough or baloneyWhen it makes sense to place a bet on anything from sports to stock marketsA groundbreaking introduction to the power of probability, Chancing It will sharpen your decision-making and maximize your luck.

Fortunately, advances in math and science have revealed the laws of chance, and understanding those laws can help in your everyday life. In chancing it, award-winning scientist and writer Robert Matthews shows how to understand the laws of probability and use them to your advantage. Make your own luck by understanding probabilityOver the years, some very smart people have thought they understood the rules of chance?only to fail dismally.

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Higgs Discovery: The Power of Empty Space Kindle Single

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Ecco #ad - In higgs discovery, lisa randall explains the science behind this monumental discovery, its exhilarating implications, and the power of empty space. For forty years, physicists searched for this capstone to the Standard Model of particle physics—the theory that describes both the most elementary components that are known in matter and the forces through which they interact.

On july 4, 2012, physicists at the large hadron Collider in Geneva madehistory when they discovered an entirely new type of subatomic particle that many scientists believe is the Higgs boson. This particle points to the Higgs field, which provides the key to understanding why elementary particles have mass.

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The Cave and the Light: Plato Versus Aristotle, and the Struggle for the Soul of Western Civilization

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Random House #ad - Aristotle, plato’s most brilliant pupil, thus settled on a philosophy very different from his instructor’s and launched a rivalry with profound effects on Western culture. Accessible, riveting, the cave and the Light provides a stunning new perspective on the Western world, and eloquently written, certain to open eyes and stir debate.

Praise for the cave and the Light  “A sweeping intellectual history viewed through two ancient Greek lenses. Plato came from a wealthy, connected athenian family and lived a comfortable upper-class lifestyle until he met an odd little man named Socrates, who showed him a new world of ideas and ideals.

The Cave and the Light: Plato Versus Aristotle, and the Struggle for the Soul of Western Civilization #ad - The competition that ensued between the two schools, and between Plato and Aristotle, set the world on an intellectual adventure that lasted through the Middle Ages and Renaissance and that still continues today. The definitive sequel to new york times bestseller how the scots invented the Modern World is a magisterial account of how the two greatest thinkers of the ancient world, Plato and Aristotle, laid the foundations of Western culture—and how their rivalry shaped the essential features of our culture down to the present day.

Rather than rely on pure contemplation, he insisted that the truest path to knowledge is through empirical discovery and exploration of the world around us. Instead of rising above mundane reality, he insisted, the philosopher’s job is to explain how the real world works, and how we can find our place in it.

Aristotle thought otherwise. Born to a family of greek physicians, Aristotle had learned early on the value of observation and hands-on experience.

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The Fabric of the Cosmos: Space, Time, and the Texture of Reality

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Vintage #ad - From brian greene, one of the world’s leading physicists and author of the Pulitzer Prize finalist The Elegant Universe, comes a grand tour of the universe that makes us look at reality in a completely different way. Space and time form the very fabric of the cosmos. Yet they remain among the most mysterious of concepts.

Is space an entity? why does time have a direction? could the universe exist without space and time? Can we travel to the past? Greene has set himself a daunting task: to explain non-intuitive, mathematical concepts like String Theory, the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle, and Inflationary Cosmology with analogies drawn from common experience.

The Fabric of the Cosmos: Space, Time, and the Texture of Reality #ad - From newton’s unchanging realm in which space and time are absolute, to einstein’s fluid conception of spacetime, Greene takes us all, regardless of our scientific backgrounds, to quantum mechanics’ entangled arena where vastly distant objects can instantaneously coordinate their behavior, on an irresistible and revelatory journey to the new layers of reality that modern physics has discovered lying just beneath the surface of our everyday world.

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Miss Leavitt's Stars: The Untold Story of the Woman Who Discovered How to Measure the Universe Great Discoveries

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W. W. Norton & Company #ad - A short, excellent account of Leavitt’s extraordinary life and achievements. Simon singh, new york times book reviewgeorge johnson brings to life Henrietta Swan Leavitt, who found the key to the vastness of the universe—in the form of a “yardstick” suitable for measuring it. Unknown in our day, leavitt was no more recognized in her own: despite her enormous achievement, she was employed by the Harvard Observatory as a mere number-cruncher, at a wage not dissimilar from that of workers in the nearby textile mills.

. Miss leavitt’s Stars uncovers her neglected history.

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Everything and More: A Compact History of Infinity

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W. W. Norton & Company #ad - Through it all, wry, wallace proves to be an ideal guide—funny, and unfailingly enthusiastic. Featuring an introduction by Neal Stephenson, this edition is a perfect introduction to the beauty of mathematics and the undeniable strangeness of the infinite. A gripping guide to the modern taming of the infinite.

New york timespart history, part philosophy, part love letter to the study of mathematics, Everything and More is an illuminating tour of infinity. With his infectious curiosity and trademark verbal pyrotechnics, Karl Weierstrass, David Foster Wallace takes us from Aristotle to Newton, Leibniz, and finally Georg Cantor and his set theory.

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