General Lee’s Immortals: The Battles and Campaigns of the Branch-Lane Brigade in the Army of Northern Virginia, 1861-1865

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Savas Beatie #ad - Its heavy combat exposure, however, resulted in devastating losses. Lane, and served with Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia for its entire existence. Who has ever written a line to tell of the sacrifices, the suffering and the ending of these more than immortal men?” he asked. In addition to a dozen original maps, general Lee’s Immortals also includes scores of rare photos—many of which were previously unpublished—all of which enhance this well written and engrossing account.

Although it took more than 150 years, captain Gatlin’s “more than immortal men” have finally received their just due in this, their first comprehensive history. These tar heels fought in nearly every major battle in t he easter n theater, sharpsburg where branch was killed, North Anna, the Wilderness, including the Seven Days’ Battles, Spotsylvania, Cold Harbor, Second Manassas, Chancellorsville where its members mistakenly shot Stonewall Jackson, Gettysburg including Pickett’s Charge, the Petersburg Campaign, Fredericksburg, and the final retreat to Appomattox.

General Lee's Immortals: The Battles and Campaigns of the Branch-Lane Brigade in the Army of Northern Virginia, 1861-1865 #ad - Originally part of A. P. Why has the history of that brigade not been written?” with the publication of General Lee’s Immortals: The Battles and Campaigns of the Branch-Lane Brigade in the Army of Northern Virginia, 1861-1865, Gatlin’s long wait is finally over. This storied brigade was first led by Lawrence Branch, and then by James H.

Hill’s famous “light division, ” the brigade earned high plaudits for it s disciplined defensive efforts, hard –hitting attacks, and incredible marching abilities. By war’s end, its roll call of casualties far exceeded its number of survivors.

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A Campaign of Giants--The Battle for Petersburg: Volume 1: From the Crossing of the James to the Crater Civil War America

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The University of North Carolina Press #ad - Ulysses S. Grant and Robert E. With new perspectives on operational and tactical choices by commanders, the experiences of common soldiers and civilians, and the significant role of the United States Colored Troops in the fighting, this book offers essential reading for all those interested in the history of the Civil War.

After failing to bull his way into petersburg, Grant concentrated on isolating the city from its communications with the rest of the surviving Confederacy, stretching Lee's defenses to the breaking point. When lee's desperate breakout attempt failed in March 1865, Grant launched his final offensives that forced the Confederates to abandon the city on April 2, 1865.

A Campaign of Giants--The Battle for Petersburg: Volume 1: From the Crossing of the James to the Crater Civil War America #ad - A week later, Lee surrendered at Appomattox Court House. Here A. Featuring some of the war's most notorious battles, the campaign played out against a backdrop of political drama and crucial fighting elsewhere, with massive costs for soldiers and civilians alike. Full of fresh insights drawn from military, political, and social history, A Campaign of Giants is destined to be the definitive account of the campaign.

Wilson greene opens his sweeping new three-volume history of the Petersburg Campaign, taking readers from Grant's crossing of the James in mid-June 1864 to the fateful Battle of the Crater on July 30 Lee squared off for more than nine months in their struggle for Petersburg, the key to the Confederate capital at Richmond.

. Grinding, and ultimately decisive, bloody, the Petersburg Campaign was the Civil War's longest and among its most complex.

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Lee's Tigers Revisited: The Louisiana Infantry in the Army of Northern Virginia

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LSU Press #ad - By the time of lee’s surrender at Appomattox, there were fewer than four hundred Louisiana Tigers still among his troops. In lee’s tigers revisited, noted Civil War scholar Terry L. Louisiana’s soldiers, reflected the state’s multicultural society, some of whom wore colorful uniforms in the style of French Zouaves, with regiments consisting of French-speaking Creoles and European immigrants.

Sometimes derided as the “wharf rats from new orleans” and the “lowest scrappings of the Mississippi, ” the Louisiana Tigers earned a reputation for being drunken and riotous in camp, but courageous and dependable on the battlefield. Lee’s tigers revisited uses letters, newspaper articles, casualties, memoirs, diaries, and muster rolls to provide a detailed account of the origins, enrollments, and desertion rates of these soldiers.

Lee's Tigers Revisited: The Louisiana Infantry in the Army of Northern Virginia #ad - Illustrations―including several maps newly commissioned for this edition―chart the Tigers’ positions on key battlefields in the tumultuous campaigns throughout Virginia. Jones dramatically expands and revises his acclaimed history of the approximately twelve thousand Louisiana infantrymen who fought in Robert E.

Lee’s army of Northern Virginia. The tigers achieved equal notoriety for their outrageous behavior off the battlefield, so much so that sources suggest no general wanted them in his command. Units made pivotal contributions to many crucial battles―resisting the initial union onslaught at first Manassas, breaking the Union line temporarily at Gettysburg’s Cemetery Hill, facilitating Stonewall Jackson’s famous Valley Campaign, containing the Union breakthrough at Spotsylvania’s Bloody Angle, holding the line at Second Manassas by throwing rocks when they ran out of ammunition, and leading Lee’s attempted breakout of Petersburg at Fort Stedman.

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"The Bloody Fifth"_The 5th Texas Infantry Regiment, Hood's Texas Brigade, Army of Northern Virginia: Volume 1: Secession to the Suffolk Campaign

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Savas Beatie #ad - The 5th’s battlefield prowess was demonstrated early in its inaugural fighting on the Virginia peninsula in early 1862, but it was at Second Manassas later that year where the regiment earned its enduring nickname by attacking and crushing the 5th New York Zouaves. The 5th texas, boasted Gen. The result is a lively account of not only the regiment’s marches and battles but also a personal look into the lives of these Texans as they struggled to survive a vicious war 2, 000 miles from home.

Schmutz’s definitive study is based upon years of archival battlefield research that uncovered hundreds of primary sources, many never before used. Vol. The 5th texas established an exceptional combat record in an army known for its fighting capabilities. The regiment took part in 38 engagements, including nearly every significant battle in the Eastern Theater, Chattanooga, and Knoxville campaigns in the Western Theater, as well as the Chickamauga, before laying down its arms forever at Appomattox.

"The Bloody Fifth"_The 5th Texas Infantry Regiment, Hood's Texas Brigade, Army of Northern Virginia: Volume 1: Secession to the Suffolk Campaign #ad - Flushed with victory, the texans pushed through the disintegrating Federal lines and outdistanced not only the remainder of the brigade but the rest of the Confederate army. John bell hood in his official report, had “slipped the bridle. The undying sobriquet “The Bloody Fifth” was now part of American military history.

Lee’s army of Northern Virginia. The second installment, Gettysburg to Appomattox, will complete the history.

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January 22, 1863 - The Maps of Fredericksburg: An Atlas of the Fredericksburg Campaign, Including all Cavalry Operations, September 18, 1862

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Savas Beatie #ad - Serious students of the battle will appreciate the extensive and authoritative endnotes and complete order of battle. Neither was successful. Gottfried’s efforts to study and illustrate the major campaigns of the Civil War’s Eastern Theater. Burnside contemplated another attempt to flank Lee, but the January weather conspired against him and he was removed from command.

Unlike other treatments of this epic fight, the maps of Fredericksburg plows new ground by breaking down the entire campaign into twenty-two map sets or “action sections, ” enriched with 122 detailed full-page color maps. Lee’s army of northern virginia was forced out of Maryland in September 1862, President Abraham Lincoln grew frustrated by Maj.

The opening stages of what would come to be the Fredericksburg Campaign began in early October when the armies moved south. This is his sixth book in the ongoing Savas Beatie Military Atlas Series. After Robert E. Keyed to each piece of cartography is a full facing page of detailed text describing the units, movements, and combat including quotes from eyewitnesses depicted on the accompanying map, personalities, all of which make the Fredericksburg story come alive.

January 22, 1863 - The Maps of Fredericksburg: An Atlas of the Fredericksburg Campaign, Including all Cavalry Operations, September 18, 1862 #ad - This presentation allows readers to easily and quickly fine a map and text on virtually any portion of the campaign, from the march south to Fredericksburg to the Mud March in early 1863. After several skirmishes, it became clear Burnside would force a crossing at Fredericksburg and drive south. A final bonus is that the maps in this work unlock every other book or article written on this fascinating campaign.

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Gettysburg's Peach Orchard: Longstreet, Sickles, and the Bloody Fight for the "Commanding Ground" Along the Emmitsburg Road

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Savas Beatie #ad - The occupation of the high ground at the Peach Orchard helped General Lee rationalize ordering the tragic July 3 assault known as “Pickett’s Charge. This richly detailed study is based upon scores of primary accounts and a deep understanding of the terrain. Daniel sickles, a scheming former congressman from New York, misinterpreted his orders and occupied the orchard first.

What followed was some of Gettysburg’s bloodiest and most controversial fighting. More books have been written about the battle of Gettysburg than any other engagement of the Civil War. The historiography of the battle’s second day is usually dominated by the Union’s successful defense of Little Round Top, but the day’s most influential action occurred nearly one mile west along the Emmitsburg Road in farmer Joseph Sherfy’s peach orchard.

Gettysburg's Peach Orchard: Longstreet, Sickles, and the Bloody Fight for the "Commanding Ground" Along the Emmitsburg Road #ad - James hessler’s and britt isenberg’s gettysburg’s peach Orchard: Longstreet, Sickles, and the Bloody Fight for the “Commanding Ground” Along the Emmitsburg Road corrects that oversight. On july 2, 1863, Confederate Gen. General sickles’s questionable advance forced Longstreet’s artillery and infantry to fight for every inch of ground to Cemetery Ridge.

The confederate attack crushed the Peach Orchard salient and other parts of the Union line, threatening the left flank of Maj. However, Union Maj.

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"The Bloody Fifth"_The 5th Texas Infantry Regiment, Hood's Texas Brigade, Army of Northern Virginia: Volume 2: Gettysburg to Appomattox

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Savas Beatie #ad - The second installment in a sweeping history of the 5th Texas Infantry—“The Bloody Fifth”—one of only three Texas regiments to fight with Robert E. The result is a lively account of not only the regiment’s marches and battles but a personal look into the lives of these Texans as they struggled to survive a vicious war more than 1, 000 miles from home.

The bloody fifth”—the 5th texas infantry regiment, and important and useful appendices, with photos, Army of Northern Virginia, original maps, explanatory footnotes, Hood’s Texas Brigade, is a significant contribution to the history of Texas and the American Civil War. The bloody fifth” offers the first full-length study documenting this fabled regimental command.

The first volume, secession through the Suffolk Campaign, followed the regiment from its inception through the successful foraging campaign in southeastern Virginia in April 1863. Lee’s army of Northern Virginia. The 5th texas established an exceptional combat record in an army known for its fighting capabilities.

"The Bloody Fifth"_The 5th Texas Infantry Regiment, Hood's Texas Brigade, Army of Northern Virginia: Volume 2: Gettysburg to Appomattox #ad - Savas Beatie. The narrative ends by following many of the regiment’s soldiers on their long journey home. Schmutz’s definitive study is based upon years of archival and battlefield research that uncovered hundreds of primary sources, many never before used. Gettysburg to appomattox continues the regiment’s rich history from its march north into Pennsylvania and the battle of Gettysburg, Petersburg campaign, its transfer west to Georgia and participation in the bloody battle of Chickamauga, operations in East Tennessee, and the regiment’s return to Virginia for the overland battles Wilderness to Cold Harbor, and the march to Appomattox Court House.

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Hood's Texas Brigade: The Soldiers and Families of the Confederacy's Most Celebrated Unit Conflicting Worlds: New Dimensions of the American Civil War

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LSU Press #ad - One of the most effective units to fight on either side of the Civil War, the Texas Brigade of the Army of Northern Virginia served under Robert E. While confederate ranks declined from desertion and fractured morale in the last years of the war, this belief in a better life―albeit one built through slave labor― kept the Texas Brigade more intact than other units.

Hood’s texas brigade challenges key historical arguments about soldier motivation, volunteerism and desertion, home-front morale, and veterans’ postwar adjustment. These volunteers also took pride in their place in, or connections to, the slave-holding class that they hoped would secure their financial futures.

Lee’s army; and the fact that their families matched the men’s determination to fight and win. In hood’s texas Brigade, Susannah J. Using the letters, newspaper accounts, official reports, members of the texas brigade volunteered for a unit that moved them over a thousand miles from home, memoirs, diaries, and military records of nearly 600 brigade members, Ural argues that the average Texas Brigade volunteer possessed an unusually strong devotion to southern independence: whereas most Texans and Arkansans fought in the West or Trans- Mississippi West, believing that they would exert the greatest influence on the war’s outcome by fighting near the Confederate capital in Richmond.

Hood's Texas Brigade: The Soldiers and Families of the Confederacy's Most Celebrated Unit Conflicting Worlds: New Dimensions of the American Civil War #ad - Lee from the seven days battles in 1862 to the surrender at Appomattox in 1865. Savas Beatie. History. Ural presents a nontraditional unit history that traces the experiences of these soldiers and their families to gauge the war’s effect on them and to understand their role in the white South’s struggle for independence.

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Under the Crescent Moon with the XI Corps in the Civil War. Volume 2: From Gettysburg to Victory, 1863-1865

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Savas Beatie #ad - 2: from gettysburg to victory, 1863-1865, James S. Despite its sacrifices in the Eastern campaigns and successes in Tennessee, the reputation of the XI Corps is one of cowardice and failure. Under the crescent moon a reference to the crescent badge assigned to the corps is the first study of this misunderstood organization.

The first volume, opens with the organization of the corps and a lively description of the men in the ranks, From the Defenses of Washington to Chancellorsville, the officers who led them, the regiments forming it, 1862-1863, and the German immigrants who comprised a sizable portion of the corps. Although the brunt of stonewall jackson’s flank attack fell upon the men of the XI Corps, the manner in which they fought and many other details of that misunderstood struggle are fully examined here for the first time, and at a depth no other study has attempted.

Under the Crescent Moon with the XI Corps in the Civil War. Volume 2: From Gettysburg to Victory, 1863-1865 #ad - Thereafter, and marched through brutal december weather without adequate clothing, the corps hastened westward to reinforce a Union army in besieged Chattanooga, or provisions to help rescue a second Northern army under siege in Knoxville, shoes, Tennessee. Savas Beatie. This long overdue study will stand as the definitive history of the XI Corps.

. As the author demonstrates time and again, the men of the XI Corps were good soldiers unworthy of the stigma that has haunted them to this day. Pula completes his magisterial work on this important Union command. The xi corps served in the army of the potomac for just twelve months September 1862-August 1863, during which it played a pivotal role in the critical battles of Chancellorsville and Gettysburg.

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Normandy '44: D-Day and the Epic 77-Day Battle for France

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Atlantic Monthly Press #ad - For both sides, the challenges were enormous. Savas Beatie. The brutal landings on the five beaches and subsequent battles across the plains and through the lanes and hedgerows of normandy―a campaign that, Thunderbolt pilot Archie Maltbie, and through the memories of paratrooper Lieutenant Dick Winters of Easy Company, Rommel, in terms of daily casualties, German ordnance officer Hans Heinze, French resistance leader Robert Leblanc, Montgomery, British corporal and tanker Reg Spittles, was worse than any in World War I―come vividly to life in conferences where the strategic decisions of Eisenhower, and other commanders were made, and many others.

Drawing freshly on widespread archives and on the testimonies of eye-witnesses, Holland relates the extraordinary planning that made Allied victory in France possible; indeed, and mountains of materiel, were transported across the English Channel, the story of how hundreds of thousands of men, is as dramatic a human achievement as any battlefield exploit.

Ultimately ingenuity, determination, and immense materiel strength―delivered with operational brilliance―made the difference. The allies confronted a disciplined German army stretched to its limit, which nonetheless caused tactics to be adjusted on the fly. Yet as familiar as it is, as it was known, as james Holland makes clear in his definitive history, many parts of the OVERLORD campaign, are still shrouded in myth and assumed knowledge.

Normandy '44: D-Day and the Epic 77-Day Battle for France #ad - . D-day, 1944, and the seventy-six days of bitter fighting in normandy that followed the Allied landing, have become the defining episode of World War II in the west―the object of books, television series, June 6, films, and documentaries. A stirring narrative by a pre-eminent historian, Normandy ‘44 offers important new perspective on one of history’s most dramatic military engagements and is an invaluable addition to the literature of war.

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On to Petersburg: Grant and Lee, June 4-15, 1864

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LSU Press #ad - Like the four volumes that preceded it, On to Petersburg represents decades of research and scholarship and will stand as the most authoritative history of the final battles in the campaign. Rhea completes his much-lauded history of the Overland Campaign, a series of Civil War battles fought between Generals Ulysses S.

On to petersburg grant and Lee June 4 15 1864. Lee in southeastern Virginia in the spring of 1864. Rhea examines how lee, consistently fought the union army to an impasse, facing a better-provisioned army whose troops outnumbered Lee’s two to one, employing risky, innovative field tactics to counter Grant’s forces.

On to Petersburg: Grant and Lee, June 4-15, 1864 #ad - With on to Petersburg, Gordon C. Grant and Robert E. Savas Beatie. Having previously covered the campaign in his magisterial volumes on the battle of the Wilderness, To the North Anna River, and Cold Harbor, Rhea ends this series with a comprehensive account of the last twelve days of the campaign, The Battles for Spotsylvania Court House and the Road to Yellow Tavern, which concluded with the beginning of the siege of Petersburg.

On to petersburg follows the union army’s movement to the James River, and the initial assault on Petersburg, the military response from the Confederates, which Rhea suggests marked the true end of the Overland Campaign. Beginning his account in the immediate aftermath of grant’s three-day attack on Confederate troops at Cold Harbor, Rhea argues that the Union general’s primary goal was not―as often supposed―to take Richmond, but rather to destroy Lee’s army by closing off its retreat routes and disrupting its supply chains.

While grant struggled at times to communicate strategic objectives to his subordinates and to adapt his army to a faster-paced, more flexible style of warfare, Rhea suggests that the general successfully shifted the military landscape in the Union’s favor.

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